Drone Regulation

Drone Surveyors Can Now Fly Near Airports

Drone Surveyors Can Now Fly Near Airports

The FAA has officially started rolling out the system that allows instantaneous airspace authorizations. LAANC is the FAA’s new system for permitting commercial drone pilots to fly legally in controlled airspace near airports instantaneously, rather than the previous months-long manual process. This program is a huge boon for surveyors and engineers who work near airports, however there are a few things to know about LAANC before going out and flying next to a runway.

Who owns the air above your home?

Who owns the air above your home?

Who controls the airspace above your home? This question is beginning to generate a lot of attention lately. Under the current law, there is no clearly defined line to understand the answer. The courts have been kicking this concept around for decades and until recently have had relatively little need for clarity. Considering the increasing use of drones from both commercial and recreational users flying in this space, there is growing pressure to resolve this lack of clarity.  The “grey area” has yet to be defined.

For Drone Surveying, Trust a Professional

For Drone Surveying, Trust a Professional

Aerotas client John Luckow, President at Arizona Surveying, wrote an excellent commentary on a critical and under-discussed issue: as more people are using drones to start new businesses, surveyors must emphasize the importance of being Licensed Land Surveyors.

What Do New Commercial Drone Laws Mean for Surveyors?

What Do New Commercial Drone Laws Mean for Surveyors?

Daniel@aerotas.com

When Part 107 goes into effect in August, it will open huge opportunities for businesses across industries to use drones in daily operations. Given the contents of Part 107 and the state of UAV technology, land surveying stand to benefit more than most industries. In this post we highlight some of the key provisions of Part 107 that will impact land surveyors.

Receiving Waivers Under New Commercial Drone Rules

Receiving Waivers Under New Commercial Drone Rules

Logan@aerotas.com

The FAA recently released its new drone regulations, known as Part 107. Included is a provision that allows the FAA to grant waivers from most of the new restrictions. This waiver process opens up the possibility of dozens of new applications by potentially allowing flying over people, flying long distances, and many other capabilities. Though the potential is significant, there remain too many uncertainties about the waiver process for businesses to rely on it in the near future.

New FAA Commercial Drone Rules Announced

New FAA Commercial Drone Rules Announced

This morning the FAA published the first official set of rules governing commercial drone use: Part 107. When these new rules go into effect in August, businesses and public agencies will be able to use drones in most industrial applications fairly easily. While operators will be required to follow a number of rules, the key requirements decision-makers need to understand are around pilot certification, where to fly, and flying over people.

Drone Day at the Capitol: What We Learned

Drone Day at the Capitol: What We Learned

Daniel@Aerotas.com

On June 14, Aerotas cofounders Daniel Katz and Logan Campbell participated in the Drone Information Day at the State Capitol. The goal of the day was to highlight to lawmakers the ways that drones are positively impacting California and their constituents, offering a counter-narrative to the negativity that tends to dominate headlines. The day presented a unique mix of private meetings and public interaction, via a public display and demo area on the lawn of the Capitol building. The meetings offered a unique view into how the drone industry is considering its relationship to regulation.

The FAA releases new commercial UAV rules next month. What should we expect?

The FAA releases new commercial UAV rules next month. What should we expect?

Daniel@Aerotas.com

While the FAA has missed a number of deadlines for rolling out rules governing commercial UAV use in the United States, it does appear to be on track to finally launch them next month. Multiple high-ranking members of the FAA have stuck to the launch date of “late Spring” for several months now, and June 20th is the last day of Spring. This begs the pressing question: what should we expect of these new rules, called Part 107